E-Book Sales Update

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Word on the street, according to Publisher’s Weekly, is that e-book sales dipped ever so slightly in the third quarter of 2014, going from a previous 23% to 21%. The majority of the sales going to Amazon who held steady at 57% market share. The closest runner up, who wasn’t close at all, was Barnes & Noble/Nook at 14% share. Amazon the clear winner.

While e-book sales dropped, paperback sales bumped 1% from 42% to 43%. Hardcovers remained at 25%.

As e-book sales continue to bounce around, we will see what happens in 2015 as the industry, and the world, continue to move further into a fully digitalized experience.

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How to Read Moby-Dick

The Stake

mobydickwoodcut

by Bethany Taylor

While out walking my dog very early one morning I ran into a frantic woman, beseeching directions to Starbucks.

My reflexive internal response was, “I’m sorry to tell you this, ma’am, but he went down aboard the Pequod,” but I kept the joke to myself, stifled my giggles, and directed the woman towards the coffee shop.

For the most part, everything I’ve ever read about Moby-Dick has been either beautiful and solemn like a dull sermon, or dismissive of it as a baggy boring relic of bygone days. The book invites comparisons to the whale itself: the sheer size and density, a brick of over 600 page, as though its treasures must be gleaned from crosshatched ink scars carved in white slabbed pages.

For many, it is A Book To Be Read, almost a Jonahian duty that cannot be shirked lest the gods be angered, an…

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Cold Mountain—Charles Frazier

Cold Mountain (novel)

Image via Wikipedia

I couldn’t be more disappointed by this book. I bought it on the grounds of reading the first couple pages, which I deemed magnificent, and then read 150 more pages to find the novel was quite the opposite.

One word for this novel: BORING.

I hate to say that, but whoa is this book slow. I was really hoping this book would knock me off my feet, especially considering it had one a National Book Award, which in hindsight is completely absurd and scary, but it more just put me to sleep. Each time I picked it up I prayed it would get better, but page after page the plot was nonexistent and the narrative was consumed by useless details.

I’ll give Frazier a star for his ability to describe scenery, but beyond that, there’s nothing else this book offers. It’s literally a story of a man wandering through the woods in the mountains of North Carolina. Come on Frazier! You can do better than that!

Unless you like reading about flowers, trees, streams, grass, and entirely pointless events, don’t read this book.

Sorry. I was pulling for it, but it let me down.